Lucky

Follows the journey of a 90-year-old atheist and the quirky characters that inhabit his off-the-map desert town. He finds himself at the precipice of life, thrust into a journey of self-exploration.

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  • ★★★½ review by SilentDawn on Letterboxd

    64

    MKE Film Fest #2

    The most fitting final film in the history of the movies. A work of failing bodies and the minds which wrestle with timid physicality.

  • ★★★★ review by Eli Hayes on Letterboxd

    just sobbing... love you

    longtime, Mr. Stanton;

    rest peacefully, good sir.

  • ★★★★ review by LeSchroeck on Letterboxd

    I don't have any idea what Harry Dean Stanton was singing on that fiesta. But it made my cry.

    Some might say, that Stanton could or would consider himself lucky to leave this world with such a wise, relaxed, laconic & melancholic movie. Or we can consider ourselves lucky that he did.

    Lucky would answer them: this doesn't change anything for him in this scenario. He's still dead.

    And if this doesn't say enough about this wonderful little film: David Lynch is talking about the inspiring power of a tortoise.

  • ★★★½ review by Mike D'Angelo on Letterboxd

    65/100

    A.V. Club review. Not since Altman kicked right after Prairie Home Companion have we seen such a perfect cinematic epitaph.

  • ★★★½ review by davidehrlich on Letterboxd

    A wise and wistful love letter from one remarkable character actor to another, John Carroll Lynch’s “Lucky” returns 90-year-old Harry Dean Stanton to the dusty desert environs he shuffled through in 1984’s “Paris, Texas,” and offers the rawboned legend one of the best roles he’s had since. Beginning as a broad comedy before blossoming into a wry meditation on death and all the things we leave behind (a transition that kicks into gear when one of Stanton’s old friends shows up and steals the show), Lynch’s directorial debut is a wisp of a movie, blowing across the screen like a tumbleweed, but it’s also the rare portrait of mortality that’s both fun and full of life.

    READ THE FULL REVIEW ON INDIEWIRE

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