Lolo

On holiday in the south of France, chic Parisian sophisticate Violette meets life-loving IT geek Jean-René. Against all odds, there’s a real chemistry between them and at the end of the summer, Jean-René wastes no time in joining his beloved in Paris. But there’s trouble in paradise, and a third party swiftly appears to shatter the couple’s idyll: Lolo, Violette’s ultra-possessive 19-year-old son, who is determined to get rid of his mother’s lover, whatever it takes…

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  • ★★★★ review by SylvainL on Letterboxd

    Un film qu'on a envie de défendre parce que presque personne ne l'a fait, et c'est pourtant très fort, essentiellement Village of the Damned version comédie romantique. Mettre en scène une terreur parentale et le traiter avec autant d'humour, en gardant implicite l'aspect fantastique en refusant la psychologie et en caricaturant à outrance la psychanalyse, et cette manière de jouer avec les clichés des différences sociales pour aussitôt les dépasser, pour les faire exister uniquement dans la perception d'un personnage cinglé, c'est quand même rare. Et c'est crissement drôle.

  • ★★★★ review by Michelle on Letterboxd

    Decided to watch this during TIFF 2015 solely because of Julie Delpy and was pleasantly surprised at how fantastically this French comedy was done! Delpy once again proves herself to be not only a wonderful actress but a talented director as well.

  • ★★★½ review by Jason Bailey on Letterboxd

    Delpy’s fifth feature film – and her first in her native French – tells the story of a single mom (Delpy) and the kind man (Bon) she falls for while on a spa vacation. Delpy seems to set up a story of the complications of an urbane she and a provincial he making it work, and then she introduces the title character (Lacoste): the woman’s teenage son, whose subversion of the relationship first seems a charming affectation (playing out like a French 'Cyrus,' perhaps) and then reveals him to be a genuine monster, bent on sabotage and destruction. Much of the second half is watching the tumblers of disaster fall into place, teeing up a total meltdown of this poor sap’s personal and professional life, and not all viewers enjoy that kind of slow-motion car wreck. But you’ve got to give Delpy this: there’s something wonderfully gleeful about her willingness to tug that thread until the whole sweater unravels.

  • ★★★½ review by Kayleigh M on Letterboxd

    yo amo a lolo ya oficial

  • ★★★½ review by Keith Garrett on Letterboxd

    The world needs more of Julie Deply's feminism.

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