After the Storm

Ryota is an unpopular writer although he won a literary award 15 years ago. Now, Ryota works as a private detective. He is divorced from his ex-wife Kyoko and he has an 11-year-old son Shingo. His mother Yoshiko lives alone at her apartment. One day, Ryota, his ex-wife Kyoko, and son Shingo gather at Yoshiko's apartment. A typhoon passes and the family must stay there all night long.

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  • ★★★★½ review by Eli Hayes on Letterboxd

    feeling the transience of your father's spirit

    in the passing of the swallowtail before you;

    but whistle hello before his wings flap too far

    and wait, with a grin, for the next fleeting visit.

  • ★★★★★ review by YI JIAN on Letterboxd

    YOU LAUGH AND YOU CRY, YOU LAUGH AND CRY AT THE SAME TIME, YOU REALIZE THAT THE ARRIVAL OF A STORM IS INEVITABLE, BUT WHAT YOU CAN CHANGE IS YOUR OWN ATTITUDE, YOUR ENDURANCE, YOUR PATIENCE TO SIT THROUGH IT, AND OF COURSE LIKE ALL STORMS IT WILL EVENTUALLY PASS, THE SKY WILL CLEAR UP AND SO WILL YOUR KOKORO, CLOUDS WILL PART TO MAKE WAY FOR NEW OPPORTUNITIES, TRAINS WILL START RUNNING AGAIN, NO USE HOLDING ONTO YOUR FAVORITE UMBRELLA THAT'S ALREADY BROKEN, EVERYTHING WILL BE DAIJOBU. SORRY FOR THE CAPS I AM JUST SO EMOTIONAL AT THE MOMENT, THIS IS THE MOST INVIGORATING FILM I'VE SEEN IN SUCH A LONG TIME.

  • ★★★★½ review by Chris on Letterboxd

    I think, if only I could wish this into existence, Hirokazu Koreeda should make a hour long TV drama series. At the end of all of his movies I just want to spend more time with his characters. I want to see what more will happen to them. I want to see how their relationships will develop, grow, fall apart. Koreeda's films are sometimes filled with familiar figures (in After the Storm there's the ne'er-do-well father, the frustrated ex-wife, the hopeful, yet realistic mother, and the also hopeful and realistic child), characters we have seen again and again, but they are so well-crafted and just so damn human that they deserve a longer existence than they are given.

    What joy I would have if I could see Kirin Kiki on a weekly basis dealing with her family. Between her great performance here and her slightly greater performance in Koreeda's earlier Still Walking she is probably my favorite matriarch in all of cinema. She made me both laugh and tear up in this film. It's clearly a supporting role, but when she is on the screen it does not feel like it. Her subtleties have such power. To have the opportunity to see her more frequently would probably be asking too much. But I'll still ask.

    Koreeda's films are often sweet, and this one is no different. But After the Storm is also quite funny. The humor is of course found in the everyday, but that's where Koreeda's movies exist. There is nothing astounding about the plot, no larger machinations at work. And even though his movies are often sweet there is a lack of sentimentality to them. Sure your heart is tested at times (and honestly, even though this my be a funny movie it also may be Koreeda's saddest too), but all emotions are well-earned.

    The only true plot device is the titular storm, which forces a broken family to remain together for the night. Most of the last act is given to this night. Again there is humor and sadness, and a wonderful sequence in torrential ran as the characters literally chase down their dreams, as unlikely as they might be.

    In the end it adds up to a very satisfying experience. And like most of Koreeda's films I felt it ended too soon. But at the same time it ended when it need to. And while I wish I had more time in this world, I am glad for the time I got.

  • ★★★★★ review by Milez Das on Letterboxd

    Resting on his past glory of an award winning author Ryota, now a private detective he wastes any money he makes on gambling. He can't make ends meet nor can he pay child support.

    After the Storm bring a look on a life that becomes relevant in its memories trying to treasure them in a desperate attempt to make that life wanted. Ryota tries to get back with his ex wife, trying to spy on her current boyfriend. He is trying to make a difference within himself but his ex wife has moved on as only love can't make them be together as to be a grown up a person has to act like one, be responsible and Ryota isn't cut of for that.

    Directed by Hirokazu Koreeda, he brings a life into these characters making us see the reality of situations that we all sometimes cling on to. We don't really like to be compared to our parents as Ryota is being compared to his father over times. Even when asked to is son if he wants to be like his father he answers no.

    The beauty of the movie comes in when the Storm hits. Ryota tries to recreate a memory that has long gone from him, he wants to make a memory with his son that can last forever within him. Like he had with his father and those lottery tickets.But Ryota understands the meaning of that night as it starts to pass. He knows what is going to happen the next morning After the Storm.

    After the Storm brings an observation of life, responsibilities, being a parent and memories. It becomes a part of you somehow. It has its beauty throughout its runtime, it bring a beautiful melody of connection in its final moments. I loved the scene where Ryota's son ask him if he has achieved what he wanted to be and Ryota says, I'm not who I want to be, yet. But you know, it doesn't matter whether

    I've become what I wanted. What matters is to live my life trying

    to become what I want to be.

  • ★★★★ review by Matt Singer on Letterboxd

    We must approach life like a cup of ices that has frozen solid: Just keep chipping away. There are no shortcuts.

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