Rainbow Time

Todd grew up under the strange shadow of his older mentally challenged brother Shonzi. As kids, Shonzi forced Todd to make action movies. As adults he pressures him to share love life details, even showing Shonzi a sex tape he made with an old girlfriend to help him cope when family tragedy hits. When their dad suffers a heart attack, Shonzi (now 40, and still a virgin) moves in with Todd and his new girlfriend Lindsay. Shonzi wants desperately to be included in their relationship like old times. When Shonzi’s begging become threats to reveal secrets from their past, Todd must find the courage to be honest with Lindsay, even if it means the end of their relationship.

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  • ★★★★ review by Max Oxley on Letterboxd

    Fantastic. Every character feels so real when they could easily have been unlikeable caricatures. I can only say this so many times, but Melanie Lynskey is so adorable she makes me wanna die. This and Blue Jay have come along at just the right time to remind me how great mumblecore can be.

  • ★★★★½ review by Steve Pulaski on Letterboxd

    Rainbow Time is frequently funny, but we're never laughing at anyone, which is very important given how Shonzi and his actions could've easily been the concluding punchline for many of the scenes in this film. Phillips is smarter than that, however, and instead crafts a film that's respectful and wise regarding the treatment of women in addition to drawing a complex character like Shonzi in an equally respectful light. Many films have been made about "that" family member or someone in our lives we can't live with nor without. Few have been as smart of as compelling in a natural sense as this one.

    Read the full review on my personal website, stevethemovieman.proboards.com/thread/5389/rainbow-time

  • ★★★½ review by Nina Read on Letterboxd

    Fantastically unique/bizarre/cute/odd.

    Fun.

  • ★★★★½ review by Mariner35 on Letterboxd

    Shonzi is a young man who does not pay attention to the boundaries that the majority use to keep their interactions in check. But what he lacks in empathy he makes up for in brutal honesty which seems remarkably refreshing next to the lies and minimizing duplicity of his brother Todd. In between these two warring siblings comes Todd's girlfriend Lindsay played beautifully by Melanie Lynskey. She brings an understanding and idealism into the friendship that grates against Todd but which also backfires when Shonzi confuses her compassion with attraction. There are plenty of cringe-worthy moments as the three navigate through their budding relationships and they lead the viewer into some tough territory that requires some rethinking and self-examination to traverse successfully. A fascinating and refreshing film.

  • ★★★½ review by Chris Krapek on Letterboxd

    It's very troubling that the writer and director would cast himself as one of the leads, a man with a developmental disability. Why not cast someone with a an actual developmental disability than just getting a shitty haircut?

    That said, it's a pretty good movie.

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